about DGC - biography

Dan Gerstein is a versatile, perceptive, battle-tested communications strategist and nationally-recognized political commentator with a successful solo consulting practice based in New York City.

Following a distinguished 11-year stint working in national politics, Gerstein formed Dan Gerstein Consulting (DGC) in 2004. DGC specializes in helping organizations, businesses, and the occasional politician win public arguments. Clients range from the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools to Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions to Kirsten Gillibrand’s winning campaign for Congress in New York.

In the fall of 2006, Gerstein helped engineer Joe Lieberman’s historic re-election in the nationally-watched U.S. Senate race in Connecticut. He served as communications director and a lead strategist for Lieberman’s general election campaign, which was honored by National Journal as the political “Comeback of the Year” for 2006.

In addition to his work as a communications consultant, Gerstein, 42, is a multi-platformed political pundit and analyst. He has appeared frequently on national and local television and radio news programs -- including on Fox News, MSNBC, and NY1 -- to discuss national political news and trends. He has also written several op-eds for publications such as the Wall Street Journal and the New York Post. In early 2006 Gerstein branched out online with his own blog, Dangerous Thoughts. And in 2007, Gerstein became a regular columnist for The Politico.

Prior to moving to New York, Gerstein spent 10 years working for Senator Lieberman in a variety of senior positions, including as a strategist for Lieberman’s 2004 presidential campaign. Gerstein orchestrated the initial public launch of Lieberman’s pathbreaking candidacy for president in Connecticut. He then went on to serve as the campaign’s deputy communications director, where he coordinated the strategic planning process, directed the policy and speechwriting operations and led daily briefings of the candidate.

Gerstein also served as chief national spokesman for Lieberman’s vice-presidential campaign in 2000, managing relations with national and local reporters, assisting in development of communications strategy and rapid response efforts, and writing statements and select speeches. One of the speeches Gerstein worked with Lieberman on was a widely-praised address on the role of religion in public life at the University of Notre Dame.

When not on the campaign trail, Gerstein served as communications director in Lieberman’s Senate office from 1999-2004, acting as chief message strategist, spokesman and speechwriter, as well as a senior policy advisor. Gerstein began his tenure in Lieberman’s office in 1995 as a legislative aide, specializing in education, communication, and cultural issues.

Gerstein made his mark on Capitol Hill in several ways. He collaborated with Lieberman on his renowned floor statement regarding the impeachment of President Clinton. He was the chief architect of Lieberman’s high-profile values agenda, helping to craft the V-chip law and initiating an FTC investigation into the marketing of adult-rated entertainment products to children. He was a leading strategist behind the passage of the groundbreaking No Child Left Behind education reform bill. And he drafted legislation to expand the federal charter school program that became law in 1998.

Gerstein is a native of West Hartford, Connecticut, and a graduate of Harvard College, with a B.A. in History. His first professional experience was a four-year run as a staff reporter for the Hartford Courant, where he covered local sports, community affairs, and politics.

Gerstein currently resides in Manhattan, where he is active in local politics and civic life. He is the co-founder of Food for Thought, a monthly discussion group that brings together accomplished young professionals from across the city’s political spectrum to chew on new, thought-provoking ideas. He is also a member of the New York Public Library’s Young Lions organization, the New York Film Forum, the Lincoln Center Film Society, and the Public Theater.